*grub* (Slang)

*grub*

Definition: To borrow or find.

Example: 1) I grubbed a cigarette from the girl at the bar.

Etymology: The Indo-European root of ‘grub’ means ‘to dig’.
When you look for something (like a cigarette) you ‘dig around’ for it, scratching through the dirt and debris to find the thing you need.

Synonyms: bum

*put out*

*put out*
(This phrasal verb has more than one meaning)

Definition: to take something outside your house and leave it there for someone to collect.
(This phrasal verb has more than one meaning)

E.g.1. Have you put the rubbish out? The dustbin men will be here soon.
E.g.2. In some countries, they put old furniture out on the street so that anyone that wants it can take it away.

This phrasal verb can be separated.

*sweep away*

*sweep away*

Definition: to be removed or destroyed by the movement of a river or the sea.

E.g.1. There were some beach huts here, but they were swept away by the flood.
E.g.2. Be careful on the boat – you don’t want to fall in the sea and be swept away by the current.

This phrasal verb can be separated.

*bump off*

*bump off*

Definition: To kill or murder; to assassinate.

Example: 1) Igor got bumped off last week. The police have no clue who did it.

Etymology: This phrase comes from 1920s American gangster slang. When you ‘bump’ something, you give it a little push. ‘Off’ means ‘not on’. So if you ‘bump’ someone ‘off’, you push him toward the end of his life.

Synonyms: rub out

*drop off*

Definition: to fall asleep.

(This phrasal verb has more than one meaning)

E.g.1. Oh! I must have dropped off! This isn’t the TV programme I was watching earlier.
E.g.2. The baby’s mother started to rock him gently, and he soon dropped off.

This phrasal verb can’t be separated.